LASIK for short-sightedness

Myopia (short-sightedness) is when people see near objects more clearly, but distant objects are blurry.

It occurs when light rays entering the eye are focused in front of the retina instead of directly on it.

Myopia is usually a result of the curvature (power) of the cornea being too strong or the length of the eyeball being too long.

Myopia is often inherited; it usually starts in childhood and typically stabilizes in the late teens or early adulthood.

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How Does LASIK Treat Myopia?

Myopia is caused when the cornea is not shaped properly. Common “misshapes” include the eye being too long, or the cornea being too curved. When light enters the eye through the misshapen eye, it is not focused correctly on the retina. As a result, the brain interprets the nerve signal as a blurry image.

Glasses and contacts correct myopia by compensating for the shape of the eye. They both allow for the light to be focused correctly on the retina, but only when you are wearing them. LASIK (laser vision correction), however, actually reshapes the cornea so that light can focus correctly without the use of corrective lenses.

LASIK procedure uses two lasers – a femtosecond and an excimer. The femtosecond laser is used to create access to the cornea (creation of the corneal flap). The excimer is then used to remove excess tissue from the cornea to create the correct curvature to allow for light to be focused properly. This is what results in a clearer image after LASIK.

For nearsighted people, the goal is to flatten the cornea whilst with farsighted people, a steeper cornea is desired. Excimer lasers correct astigmatism by smoothing an irregular cornea into a more normal shape.

What treatment options are available for Myopia?

The following procedures are suitable for myopia:

Bladeless Laser Surgery | TransPRK/ASLA Laser Surgery | ICL Eye Surgery | SMILE